Education through print and interactive media.

A matching card game focused on habitats.

A matching card game focused on habitats.

This project consisted of nine designers, each being assigned three letters of the alphabet to design for (with one cover designer). This project aims to educate Elementary students on symbiotic relationships and environments through an ABC matching card game.

This project consisted of nine designers, each being assigned three letters of the alphabet to design for (with one cover designer). This project aims to educate Elementary students on symbiotic relationships and environments through an ABC matching card game.

This project consisted of nine designers, each being assigned three letters of the alphabet to design for (with one cover designer). This project aims to educate Elementary students on symbiotic relationships and environments through an ABC matching card game.

ROLE

Illustration, Prototyping

DURATION

12 weeks, Fall 2019

abc_banner

00  ─  PURPOSE

Teaching children about relationships and habitats through a matching card game.

Creating intertwined print and interactive experiences to educate students about relationships and habitats in nature.

For elementary school teachers, it can be difficult to make the assigned curriculum interesting and engaging for their class. Our project aims to assist teachers in educating students about habitats through a fun and social way.

For elementary school teachers, it can be difficult to make the assigned curriculum interesting and engaging for their class. Our project aims to assist teachers in educating students about habitats through a fun and social way.

01 ─ RESEARCH

Identifying existing symbiotic relationships to create our pairings.

Identifying existing symbiotic relationships to create our pairings.

A large part of our research process was devoted to identifying existing pairings within nature that could cover every letter of the alphabet. Although time-consuming, this was important to create these pairings as they are the pillars of our project. My letters for the project were G, T, and Y.

A large part of our research process was devoted to identifying existing pairings within nature that could cover every letter of the alphabet. Although time-consuming, this was important to create these pairings as they are the pillars of our project. My letters for the project were G, T, and Y.

letters

We interviewed seven elementary school teachers to best design our game.

After establishing that we wanted to design our game for elementary level students and their teachers, we conducted seven user interviews with school teachers to discover how they currently keep their classes engaged. I conducted four of the seven interviews.

Keep it Simple
Assist
Interactiv

02 ─ PROJECT GOALS

Education through imagination

Strike the balance between a childs imagination and the education they are partaking in.

Provide the building blocks

While keeping the game as simple as possible, provide enough context for teachers to immediately jump into the topic.

Layer and enhance experiences

Make sure that the experiences can stand on their own, but are enhanced by layering on one another.

Reinforce existing topics

Because the curriculum is already defined for teachers, the game and experiences should fit into existing required topics.

03 ─ STRUCTURE

To establish consistency in our cards, our group employed a rapid iteration exercise.

Utilizing group ideation exercises to control and keep consistent with our separate experiences.

With the inherent nature of our project being collaborative in both its creation and solution, we had to make sure to come together as a group and establish consistent assets and points of entry for both our print and interactive experiences. I utilized exercises learned through participating in sprint sessions to help our group establish these points in our project.

Because all nine of our group members had different ideas of what the playing cards should look like, I led a rapid ideation exercise in which each designer got four index cards, and was given a single minute to quickly sketch out their idea before moving onto the next card. This exercise allowed us to quickly produce a myriad of potential solutions before narrowing down and discussing which sketches stood out to us.

PRINT EXPERIENCE

Establishing consistency in our card game through a fast-paced crazy 4-'s exercise.

Because all nine of our group members had different ideas of what the playing cards should look like, I led a rapid ideation exercise in which each designer got four index cards, and was given a single minute to quickly sketch out their idea before moving onto the next card. This exercise allowed us to quickly produce a myriad of potential solutions before narrowing down and discussing which sketches stood out to us.

Because all nine of our group members had different ideas of what the playing cards should look like, I led a rapid ideation exercise in which each designer got four index cards, and was given a single minute to quickly sketch out their idea before moving onto the next card. This exercise allowed us to quickly produce a myriad of potential solutions before narrowing down and discussing which sketches stood out to us.

crazy4

Iterating and iterating and iterating...

Persistance and communication was key when moving from sketches towards our final card structures. We utilized an iterative and consistent group critique based strategy to consistently update our card structures when needed. In addition, we utilized component based templates through Figma to quickly make changes and test drafts of all of our cards.

Because all nine of our group members had different ideas of what the playing cards should look like, I led a rapid ideation exercise in which each designer got four index cards, and was given a single minute to quickly sketch out their idea before moving onto the next card. This exercise allowed us to quickly produce a myriad of potential solutions before narrowing down and discussing which sketches stood out to us.

cards

Final Card Wireframe

After establishing a collective group of iterations for our card game, we set to establishing a final template for our cards. As this game is for a young audience, we had to make sure our information was both digestible, as well as well-balanced with the illustration.

wireframe
icon

CARD COMPONENT

Identifier Icon

To add another layer to the cards, as well as to assist players in finding their match, we added in an identifier icon to the cards. When put together, the icon is completed and the player can be sure that their match is correct.

CARD COMPONENT

Biome Label

During our consideration for the card game, we recognized a need for our game to fit within the existing academic curriculum that teachers are expected to teach their students. To remedy this, we made sure to add a biome label to our cards that indicates which habitat the animal is a part of.

This also gives teachers the opportunity to utilize these cards for educating students about habitats and biomes, which is a part of their required curriculum.

habitats_test

INTERACTIVE EXPERIENCE

Designing a container to house our interactive experiences, allowing children to explore and learn about the entire set of relationships and letters.

Although individuality existed within each group members interactive experiences, we recognized the need for a consistent "container" to house these experiences. We leveraged our research about current classroom technology to imagine a tablet experience that allows for easy access to all of our digital card experiences. We set two goals for this container:

Because all nine of our group members had different ideas of what the playing cards should look like, I led a rapid ideation exercise in which each designer got four index cards, and was given a single minute to quickly sketch out their idea before moving onto the next card. This exercise allowed us to quickly produce a myriad of potential solutions before narrowing down and discussing which sketches stood out to us.

Group 4
Group 8

Final Interactive Container

Our final container is made to balance the showcasing of our individual experiences while still maintaining a simple navigational structure, with clear points of entry to the additional features of the container.

container
navigation

INTERACTIVE COMPONENT

Spinning wheel navigation

To introduce a fun and interesting navigational interaction, we imagined a spinning wheel that allows a student to quickly scroll and find their favorite letter, keeping the exploration of the letters at the forefront.

INTERACTIVE COMPONENT

Educational card pairings

In addition to playing the interactive experience, a student can easily view the cards pairing as well as information on how the two animals interact and help one another exist. This allows for an easy educational opportunity, while keeping the matching component of the print media.

pairing
grid

INTERACTIVE COMPONENT

Grid card view

As a secondary form of navigational entry to the cards, we included a grid view that shows a visual of each card, allowing students who may be more visually inclined to exploring the cards to still easily navigate the container.

ipadmockup

04 ─ SOLUTION

To establish consistency in our cards, our group employed a rapid iteration exercise.

Individually creating my card illustrations and interactive experiences.

With the structures set up for both our card game as well as our interactive experience containers, we branched out to individually design our card illustrations and our tablet interactions, allowing each group member to put their own mark on the project.

Because all nine of our group members had different ideas of what the playing cards should look like, I led a rapid ideation exercise in which each designer got four index cards, and was given a single minute to quickly sketch out their idea before moving onto the next card. This exercise allowed us to quickly produce a myriad of potential solutions before narrowing down and discussing which sketches stood out to us.

Illustrations designed to explore the habitats of the animals.

While illustrating my animals, I took careful consideration to allow a player to be both visually satisfied with the illustration, while still keeping in mind that these cards would be used for educating students about habitats. My final illustrations are an exploration of an animals habitat, and have a sense of depth to the scene that allows a player to explore the different details.

G
Y
T

Creating a digital workbook through my interactive experiences

My interactions are each composed of two core parts: a small interactive activity, and then an explorative animation that the student can use to learn more about the habitat their animal comes from.

Giant Tarantula

Tegeticula Moth

Yucca Plant

Building off our initial card game to help guide future conversations.

We designed a set of discussion cards that draw upon several core concepts that the game can be used to speak about. By doing this, our game is kept flexible enough to allow teachers to utilize it in any way they want, while still having the discussion cards to jump off of.

discussion

PRINT MEDIA

FINCONCLUSION

To establish consistency in our cards, our group employed a rapid iteration exercise.

Taking time to focus on iteration and ideation was a crucial part of our project, and I am very happy with the results!

Taking on a task like designing a card game was not an easy feat, but I am incredibly proud of our team for pulling through and designing it! Overall, I learned that complexity is not always better, especially when trying to explain concepts to children.

You can view the rest of the card deck and my groupmates work at this fancy schmancy link.

Because all nine of our group members had different ideas of what the playing cards should look like, I led a rapid ideation exercise in which each designer got four index cards, and was given a single minute to quickly sketch out their idea before moving onto the next card. This exercise allowed us to quickly produce a myriad of potential solutions before narrowing down and discussing which sketches stood out to us.

TIME FOR ONE MORE?

Creating effective task management habits.

Creating effective task management habits.

notch

SORRY, NO MORE TO SEE

But here's more about me! I'm a user experience designer who isn't afraid of the hustle, but is terrified of the Goliath Birdeater Spider. I'm an early 2000's pop lover, and I make a mean buffalo chicken dip. Wanna talk? Get in touch!

SORRY, NO MORE TO SEE

But here's more about me! I'm a user experience designer who isn't afraid of the hustle, but is terrified of the Goliath Birdeater Spider. I'm an early 2000's pop lover, and I make a mean buffalo chicken dip. Wanna talk? Get in touch!